The 5 Pitfalls of Safety Metrics

5. They are Reactive OSHA rates were never meant for the process of being competitive metrics. Their use was to create comparisons for better understanding of injuries and focused programs. If the only item that projects bonuses or success for a company is injury rates, then the organization is missing the point entirely. Injuries shouldContinue reading “The 5 Pitfalls of Safety Metrics”

The Evolution of Safety Auditing

There are many ways that safety programs are audited and evaluated. There are some that are internal to the organization or site and there are others that are used external. Some companies use the idea of intra-site auditing where safety people from other sites perform a documented audit on another site. Year-over-year there are rotationsContinue reading “The Evolution of Safety Auditing”

Safety: Behavior or Motivation

I was recently at my final residency. Part of this process was to complete my dissertation research plan. The discussion around my topic about safety was talking about the theory behind the process of safety psychology.   On a complete side note, I did learn that with a qualitative research plan the theory is reallyContinue reading “Safety: Behavior or Motivation”

The 5 Principles of Root Cause Analysis

I have been very fortunate in my career to have learned to perform 5-why or root cause investigation in various industries and using various techniques. This knowledge from automotive, Japanese automotive, food manufacturing, chemical, and nuclear as a facilitator of RCA has given me a very unique perspective of how an effective investigation is conducted.Continue reading “The 5 Principles of Root Cause Analysis”

Can you predict safety culture

I commute about an hour one-way for my job. It is open road travel so I have time for thinking and listening to books. I am a huge sci-fi buff. So, my recent addiction is Isaac Asimov’s Foundation Series. In the series, a mathematician names Hari Seldon has created a new science called psychohistory. ThisContinue reading “Can you predict safety culture”

Nature and Nurture in Safety: Part 6

What happens when a person with a high tolerance for risk joins an organization that creates a culture of profit before safety? Nature + Nurture = Outcome Negative + Negative = Danger A high tolerance for risk is not a bad personal trait. It is part of who that person is. The problem can occurContinue reading “Nature and Nurture in Safety: Part 6”

Nature and Nurture in Safety: Part 5

When evaluating what is considered a negative behavior (nature), it suits to first define that aspect of safety behavior first. This is not to imply that people got to work and choose to get hurt. This is far from the truth. There are those, naturally, who have a much larger acceptance of risk. They doContinue reading “Nature and Nurture in Safety: Part 5”

Nature and Nurture in Safety: Part 4

“Science may have found a cure for most evils; but it has no remedy for the worst of them all – the apathy of human beings” – Helen Keller Nature + Nurture = Outcome Positive + Non-Existent = Apathetic Safety Continuing on the theme of nature versus nurture, what happens when someone has a positiveContinue reading “Nature and Nurture in Safety: Part 4”

Nature and Nurture for Safety Part 3

When it comes to behaviors, the idea of nature and nurture always becomes a debatable position. In some ways, managers and companies like the idea of blaming nature for work place injuries. I hate the saying “can’t fix stupid.” Too many times in my career, I have heard that from supervisors and managers who feelContinue reading “Nature and Nurture for Safety Part 3”

Nature and Nurture for Safety: Part 2

Overall, the debate of nurture vs nature is not one that I am will to address. There are, though, some aspects of nature and nurture in the way safety becomes behavioral and organizational. For the sake of simplicity, nature will be defined as someone’s general safety philosophy before entering the workplace. Nurture will be definedContinue reading “Nature and Nurture for Safety: Part 2”